CATALOG page 2

  • To be eligible for STRF, you must be a California resident or are enrolled in a residency program, prepaid tuition, paid or deemed to have paid STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the following:

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  • The institution, a location of the institution, or an educational program offered by the institution was closed or discontinued, and you did not choose to participate in a teach-out plan approved by the Bureau or did not complete a chosen teach-out plan approved by the Bureau.

  • You were enrolled at an institution or a location of the institution within the 120 -day period before the closure of the institution or location of the institution or were enrolled in an educational program within the 120-day period before the closure of the institution or were enrolled in an educational program within the 120-day period before the program was discontinued.

  • You were enrolled at an institution or location of the institution more than 120 days before the closure of the institution or location of the institution, in an educational program offered by the institution as to which the Bureau determined there was a significant decline in the quality or value of the program more than 120 days before closure.

  • The institution has been ordered to pay a refund by the Bureau but has failed to do so.

  • The institution has failed to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federal student loan program as required by law or has failed to pay or reimburse proceeds received by the institution in excess of tuition and other costs.

  • You have been awarded restitution, a refund, or other monetary award by an arbitrator or court, based on a violation of this chapter by an institution or representative of an institution, but have been unable to collect the award from the institution.

  • You sought legal counsel that resulted in the cancellation of one or more of your student loans and have an invoice for services rendered and evidence of the cancellation of the student loan or loans.

  • To qualify for STRF reimbursement, the application must be received within four (4) years from the date of the action or event that made the student eligible for recovery from STRF.

  • A student whose loan is revived by a loan holder or for the debt that would have otherwise been eligible for recovery debt collector after a period of non-collection at any time, file a written application for recovery from STRF. It has been more than four (4) years since the action or event that made the student eligible, the student must have filed a written application for recovery within the original four (4) year period, unless the period has been extended by another act of law.

  • However, no claim can be paid to any student without a social security number or a taxpayer identification number.

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  • FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

  • The Financial Aid Policy at Mashdots College aims at providing financial assistance to students who qualify based on academic achievement and demonstrated need. The criteria and requirements for eligibility are devised by the Admissions Financial Aid Committee and approved by MC's faculty, President and Board of Trustees.

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  • All scholarships and aid are granted to full-time students on an annual basis. All communication and forms related to financial assistance must be addressed to the Financial Aid Office. Students applying for financial aid for the Fall Semester must apply and submit all supporting documents by the preceding May 1; the deadline for Spring Semester is the preceding Nov. 1. The total financial aid award to any student (including loans) cannot exceed the student's total financial need as determined by MC.\

  • MC Scholarships

  • Scholarship Renewal.  No scholarship, grant, award, loan or employment from MC will be renewed automatically. To renew their financial aid each year, students must follow the designated process. Recipients of financial aid must remain in good standing and maintain normal progress as defined in the Normal Academic Progress section of this catalog.

  • A. Armenian Studies Scholarships are awarded to students who are taking a major in Armenian Studies.

  • Qualified students may be awarded up to 50% of their tuition if they show evidence of academic achievement, maintain a 3.0 GPA and participate in the cultural activities of the College.

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  • B. Merit Scholarships are awarded to students who demonstrate academic achievement and financial need and who participate in the cultural activities of the College.

  • SERVICES TO STUDENTS

  • Student services are provided by the College to encourage student co-curricular activities, to enhance students' academic, intellectual, social and spiritual growth and to promote school spirit.

  • PHYSICAL FACILITIES

  • The College's academic and administrative facilities provide students with a comfortable and stimulating environment in which to learn. The Armenian Studies Department provides students one of the best Armenian Studies collections in the world. The Computer Training Department provides both desktop and laptop computers for students enrolled in computer classes. Early Childhood Education students have access to professional journals and magazines to update their skills. Translation and Interpretation students are provided with special mentors from the professional community to put their skills into practice.  Adjacent to the college, there are numerous restaurants and outdoor facilities where students congregate during their recess and free hours.

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  • MASHDOTS COLLEGE LIBRARY

  • The College Library, open to students, scholars and community members, contains one of the fastest growing collections of Armenian literature in the United States. Currently enrolled students may borrow materials. Community members are welcome to use materials in the library but may not borrow materials to take home. Students may borrow up to 10 items. Overdue fines are charged for any items returned after the due date or time. If any materials are lost or damaged, students are responsible for paying the item’s replacement cost.

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  • The Armenian Studies Department maintains a sizable collection of books, journals, and newspapers. Books covering the entire spectrum of Armenian studies are found in the collection, including old and rare books. Professional journals of Armenian studies are received regularly from all Armenian academic centers. Newspapers from all over the world are also collected at Mashdots College.

  • MATRICULATION SERVICES

  • Matriculation is a process that is designed to assist students in planning, selecting, and achieving educational goals. The process brings the college and a student into agreement for the purpose of realizing the student's educational goal through the college's established programs, policies, and requirements. The agreement acknowledges responsibilities of both the college and the student to attain these objectives. The primary purpose of matriculation is enhancing student success.

  • ORIENTATION

  • The orientation workshop, combining a short videotape with a presentation by a member of the college faculty, will give the student important information regarding the services, programs and courses available through the college.

  • New and transfer students are required to participate in the orientation program.

  • ASSESSMENT

  • To help the students determine their skill levels in many academic areas, including written English expression, the college provides a comprehensive assessment program. Assessment scores assist the students and counselors to determine the appropriate courses for students to enroll during the first semester.

  • STUDENT HOUSING

  • Mashdots College has no dormitory facilities under its control but advises students of the availability of housing located reasonable near the institution’s facilities.

  • An estimation of the approximate range would be $2,000.00 (estimate) for a shared apartment (2 bedrooms) to 2,500.00 (estimate).

  • An estimation of the approximate range would be $1,500.00 to $1,800.00 (estimate) for a 1 bedroom private apartment.

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  • COUNSELING SERVICES

  • One of the most important activities involved in the matriculation process is counseling and educational planning. College faculty and academic counselors are available to assist each new student in several areas:

  • 1.Deciding upon an educational objective;

  • 2. Determining the courses required to achieve this objective;

  • 3. Determining the services needed to assist students in achieving their objective;

  • 4. Assisting students in course selection appropriate to their goals.

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  • FOLLOW-UP

  • Counseling and teaching faculty provide a number of follow-up services to matriculated students.  These services are designed to provide information regarding the students' academic progress.  Special services are provided to students on academic and/or progress probation; Referrals are made to off campus services when appropriate.

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  • OTHER COUNSELING SERVICES

  • 1. Career Counseling

  • The Career Center assists students in determining their academic majors, vocational or career goals. Career counseling helps students integrate their aspirations with the work world.

  • 2. Adult Re-entry Services

  • The Adult Re-entry Program provides academic, career and personal counseling services to students who are returning to formal education after a lapse of time.

  • 3. Financial Aid

  • The Financial Aid Office provides the student with counseling regarding his/her financial circumstances and will assist the student in obtaining financial support needed to attend the college.

  • STUDENT COUNCIL

  • The College student body elects its Student Council, which assists the Dean in coordinating on-campus student activities.  Its chief responsibilities are to coordinate non-academic student activities and to represent the student body on faculty and administrative committees.

  • College students are encouraged to actively participate in inter-college activities organized by other colleges and host inter-college on-campus activities organized by them.

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  • COMMUNITY SERVICES

  • The College organizes public lectures, cultural performances; art exhibits, seminars, workshops, and academic programs, and provides technical, professional, and administrative assistance to agencies and groups in the community.  These services extend opportunities for College faculty and students to share their talents with the community, to enhance community interest in the pursuit of truth at the College, to recruit students and to generate income to help underwrite academic programs.

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  • Community services are coordinated through the President's Office. Responsibility for specific programs may be assigned to faculty or academic departments.

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  • ANNUAL EDUCATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

  • The College sponsors the Annual Educational Symposium, a conference for teachers, administrators, professionals, students and interested community members, with invited papers prepared by recognized specialists in each topic. A lecture-discussion format is used. Selected papers are published for future scholarly reference.

  • JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES

  • All graduates have equal access to the Job Placement Office. The College will make every effort to supply employment leads to all students and prospective graduates. It is also expected that graduates utilizing this service will make every effort to secure a position.

  • No guarantees are made as an inducement to enroll, nor can promises be made that placement is assured upon graduation. However, the College has been extremely successful in assisting graduates in finding career positions.

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  • RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

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  • RIGHTS

  • Freedom of Access. MC is open to all applicants qualified according to its published admissions policies and standards. Upon matriculation, each student has access to all MC services and facilities for which he/she is qualified. Access may be denied to persons who are not MC students.

  • Classroom Rights and Privileges. Instructors are expected to encourage open discussion and inquiry. Students may take reasoned exception to information offered in any course and should make judgment on matters of informed opinion.

  • Protection against Improper Disclosure. Students' views, political associations and beliefs which are confided to instructors, advisors and counselors during the performance of their duties are confidential.

  • College Governance. As members of the College community, students are free individually and collectively to express their interests. As vehicles for this purpose, provisions are made for student self-government as well as for student representation on the College committees and other decision-making bodies.

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  • Students with complaints/grievances relating to classroom matters should first discuss them with their instructor. Unresolved complaints/grievances should be directed to the President’s Office. If dissatisfied with the response or solution, the student should contact the Chair of the Board of Trustees.

  • GUIDELINES FOR WRITING A GRIEVANCE

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  • Draft a letter. The grievance is initiated when the student submits a formal grievance and supporting documentation. Explain the situation completely and accurately is a well-written document that outlines the situation, states your position and requests your desired outcome or solution.

  • Checklist for Student Submitting Grievance:

  • Name of Student, ID, Date you are filing the grievance;

  • Program you are enrolled in;

  • The office or individual the grievance is against;

  • Location, date and time the alleged incident occurred;

  • Full names of all witnesses;

  • Reason or basis of grievance;

  • Date and details of informal discussion with individual(s) regarding the alleged incident;

  • Date and details of informal discussion with Department Chair/Dean regarding the alleged incident;

  • Resolution or remedy being sought.

  • Be thorough. Please remember that the grievance documentation stating your position and desired outcome is a key component used to evaluate the situation along with feedback from witness(es) or persons with direct knowledge. This letter may be your only opportunity to communicate the situation and your desired resolution.

  • Include any and all supporting documentation that you feel will help clearly state and support.

  • Your position. A well-written letter is best supported by examples or attestations from other students, faculty or staff when applicable.

  • Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. MC abides by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. Students have the right to inspect and review information contained in their education records, to challenge the contents of their education records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the decisions of the hearing panels are unacceptable. MC's Registrar coordinates the inspection and review procedures for student education records, which include admissions, personal, academic and financial files, and academic, cooperative education and placement records. Students wishing to review their education records must make written requests to the Registrar listing the item(s) of interest. Records covered by the Act will be made available within 45 days of the request.  Students may have copies of their records, at their own expense, with certain exceptions (e.g., a copy of a transcript upon which a "financial hold" has been placed).  Education records do not include records of instructional, administrative and educational personnel which are the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any individual (except temporary substitutes); MC Law enforcement records; student health records; employment records; or alumni records. Health records may be reviewed by physicians of the students' choosing. In addition, students may not see financial information submitted by their parents; any confidential letters or recommendations to which they have waived their rights of inspection and review; or education records containing information about more than one student. In the latter case a student will be permitted access only to that part of a record which pertains to him or her.

  • Students who believe that their education records contain information that is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights may discuss their problems informally with the Registrar, either in person or in writing.  If the Registrar agrees with a student's request, the appropriate records will be amended. If not, the student will be informed and may request a formal hearing. This request must be made in writing to the Registrar, who will inform the student of the date, place and time of the hearing before a panel selected by MC. The student may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or represented at the hearings by one or more persons of the student's choice, including attorneys, at the student's expense. Decisions of the hearing panel are final and based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The panel's judgment will be delivered to all parties concerned. If the decision is in favor of the student, the education record will be corrected. If the decision is not satisfactory to the student, he/she may place with the education records statements commenting on the information in the records or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the hearing panel. These statements will be placed in the student's education records, maintained as part of them and released whenever the records in question are disclosed.  A student who believes that the decisions of this adjudication process were unfair or not in keeping with the Act may make a written request for assistance to MC's President. Students who still believe that their rights have been abridged may file complaints with the U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C.

  • No one outside MC may have access to, nor will MC disclose, any information from a student's education record without the written consent of the student. Exceptions are MC personnel, officials of other institutions in which the student seeks to enroll, persons or organizations providing the student's financial aid, accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation functions, persons in compliance with a judicial order and persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons. Within the MC community, only members acting in the students' educational interest, individually or collectively, are allowed access to student education records. These members include personnel from the Offices of the President, Vice Academic Dean, Registrar, Financial Aid, Admission and Academic Counseling, as well as academic personnel within the limitations of their need to know.

  • At the discretion of MC officials, the following directory information will be provided: student's name, major field of study, dates of attendance and degrees and awards received. A student wishing to withhold this directory information must complete the Privacy Request Form at MC's Registrar's Office or at their center of registration. This must be done within the first 10 working days of enrollment of a semester/term.  The privacy request will be valid for one calendar year.

  • RESPONSIBILITIES

  • College Catalog. It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the information presented in this catalog and to know and observe all policies and procedures related to the program he/she is pursuing. Regulations will not be waived nor exception granted because a student pleads ignorance of policies or procedures. While academic advisers will assist students in every way possible, the responsibility for following all policies and meeting all requirements and deadlines rests with the student.  A student is expected to satisfy the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time he/she is admitted to, and begins course work in, a degree program. However, a student may elect to graduate under the catalog in force at the time of his/her graduation provided the student complies with all requirements of the later catalog. New catalogs take effect on July 1 of the year published.

  • Class Attendance. Regular and prompt attendance at all College classes is required. The instructor may assign extra work, require special examinations, or refuse to grant credit for a course if the number of absences is excessive. Students should ascertain the exact policy of each faculty member at the beginning of each course.

  • Classroom Conduct. Instructors are responsible for presenting appropriate material in courses, and students are responsible for learning this material. Although it is a student's academic performance that is evaluated in determining grades, student conduct is important in the academic setting.

  • Enrollment in a class may be terminated due to unsatisfactory student conduct, undue disrespect toward an instructor or administrator or academic dishonesty. Each student is responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance established for each course in which he/she is enrolled.

  • Academic Honesty. Each student is responsible for performing academic tasks in such a way that honesty is not in question. Unless an exception is specifically defined by an instructor, students are expected to maintain the following standards of integrity:

  • 1.    All tests, term papers, oral and written assignments and recitations are to be the work of the student presenting the material.

  • 2.    Any use of wording, ideas or findings of other persons, writers or researchers requires the explicit citation of the source; use of the exact wording requires a "quotation" format.

  • 3.    Deliberately supplying material to a student for purposes of plagiarism is also culpable.

  • A faculty member who has proof that academic honesty has been violated may take appropriate disciplinary action, including the refusal of course credit.  If a faculty member has reason to suspect academic dishonesty but is unable to prove it, he/she may require additional and/or revised work from the student. A faculty member shall bring to the attention of the dean (or faculty committee in the College) all violations of academic honesty. The Dean may place on probation, suspend, or expel any student who violates the academic honesty policy.

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  • Behavior Standards. The use or possession of alcoholic beverages, dangerous weapons, graffiti, illegal drugs, explosives, fireworks, and other dangerous substances is prohibited on MC property except by authorized personnel.

  • Smoking is prohibited in all MC buildings. The College reserves the right to dismiss any student, without financial refund, if the student fails to abide by College regulations or when such action is deemed to be in the best interests of the College or the student.

  • Sexual Harassment. MC is responsible for establishing an environment free of harassment for students, faculty and staff. Consequently, sexual harassment of MC students or employees is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Sexual harassment may involve the behavior of a person of either sex against a person of the opposite or same sex when the behavior falls within the definition of Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments.

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  • JUDICIAL PROCEDURES

  • General Principles. MC stresses not only academic and career preparation but also values and character development.  In order to preserve the quality of education, MC expects all students to conform voluntarily to the established rules, regulations and social orders and to conduct themselves at all times and in all places in a manner befitting student status. The College is not a law enforcement agency but expects all its students, whether as individuals or groups, to obey all federal, state and local laws. Violators will not be immune from prosecution under these laws.

  • The primary objective of establishing disciplinary standards is to maintain an appropriate level of conduct in the academic community. Fairness, justice and due process are required in the judicial procedure. MC judicial procedures permit members of the College community to register complaints against individuals or groups with the Dean.

  • Students found in violation of institutional regulations shall be informed of their right to due process. If a student chooses not to accept a decision made at a lower level of the judicial process, that student may appeal as outlined below. A student under disciplinary action has the right to be present on campus and to attend classes until suspended or expelled.

  • Violations of College conduct regulations are normally handled in a formal hearing before a discipline conduct board. Situations requiring such action include violation of the College's drug, alcohol and sexual behavior policies, destruction of College property, as well as situations of violence directed against another member of the campus community. The Academic Affairs Committee deals with most violations.

  • Appeals Procedures on Academic Matters. A student may appeal final grades, academic honesty decisions and most policy decisions. Procedures for appealing final grades and academic honesty are contained in the Final Grades and Academic Honesty sections of this catalog. The path of appeal for grades and course requirements starts with the instructor in the course and then goes successively to the Department Chairperson and the Academic Dean. Appeals on academic honesty decisions begin with the instructor and then may be taken in turn to the Dean. Appeals on academic policy decisions must be made to the Academic Affairs Committee. Appeals of decisions by the committee can be made to the Dean of the College and to the President, in that order.

  • Appeals must be made in writing on the appropriate appeals form. Students can obtain these forms from the Registrar. When certain appeals are granted, penalty/administrative fees may be assessed. All appeals must be made in a timely manner, generally within four weeks of the action or decision in question.

  • Appeals Procedures for Social Conduct Violations. Appeals of Student Life Conduct Committee decisions must be made within five working days to the Director of Student Services.

  • Any questions or problems concerning Mashdots College which have not been satisfactorily answered or resolved by the school should be directed to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education, 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833; (916) 431-6959 or by fax (916) 263-1897; www.bppe.ca.gov.

  • GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

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  • PROGRAMS

  • To obtain a bachelor's degree from MC, a student must complete all the appropriate residency, semester hour and general education requirements listed below, as well as specific major requirements. In addition, to qualify for graduation, the student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better, both in the major and overall. For the purpose of fulfilling elective requirements and general education requirements other than Written English, a course in which a D-level grade was received will be counted only if the course was taken at MC.

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  • BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAM

  • To receive a bachelor's degree from MC, a student must complete the following:

  • 1. A minimum of 128 semester hours, including all the general education     requirements listed in this catalog and the appropriate major requirements listed in the Programs section of this catalog.

  • 2.  A minimum of 52 semester hours at MC.

  • 3.  A minimum of 33 semester hours at the upper-division level in the major must be taken at MC.

  • DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS

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  • DEGREE PROGRAM

  • BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARMENIAN STUDIES (128 Units)

  • Core Courses (52 Semester Units)

  • Arm. 214 Survey of Armenian Literature through the 14th Cen. (3)

  • Arm. 215 Survey of Modern Armenian Literature (3)

  • Arm. 300 Advanced Modern Armenian (3)

  • Arm. 306 Elementary Classical Armenian (3)

  • Arm. 311/313    Armenian Grammar—Morphology (3)

  • Arm. 312/314    Armenian Grammar—Syntax (3)

  • Arm. 318 History of Armenian Language (3)

  • Arm. 320 American-Armenian Writers (3)

  • Arm. 399 Senior Project (3)

  • Educ. 308 Teaching—Learning Strategies—Armenian Emphasis (3)

  • Hist. 220 History of Armenian People — Origin to 1500 A.D. (3)

  • Hist. 221 History of Armenian People — 1500 A.D. to present (3)

  • Hist. 321 The Armenian Question (3)

  • Hist. 322 History of Armenian Christianity and Theology (3)

  • Hum. 362 Armenian Civilization (3)

  • SocSc 389 Topics in the Study of the Armenian Diaspora (3)

  • Art 324 Survey of Armenian Art and Architecture (4)

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  • CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

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  • R=REQUIRED

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  • ADVANCED ARMENIAN STUDIES (52 Semester Units)

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  • Core Requirements:

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  • Arm. 214 Survey of Armenian Literature through the 14th Cen. (3)

  • Arm. 215 Survey of Modern Armenian Literature (3)

  • Arm. 300 Advanced Modern Armenian (3)

  • Arm. 306 Elementary Classical Armenian (3)

  • Arm. 311/313    Armenian Grammar—Morphology (3)

  • Arm. 312/314    Armenian Grammar—Syntax (3)

  • Arm. 318 History of Armenian Language (3)

  • Arm. 320 American-Armenian Writers (3)

  • Arm. 399 Senior Project (3

  • Educ. 308 Teaching—Learning Strategies—Armenian Emphasis (3)

  • Hist. 220 History of Armenian People — Origin to 1500 A.D. (3)

  • Hist. 221    History of Armenian People — 1500 A.D. to present (3)

  • Hist. 321    The Armenian Question (3)

  • Hist. 322    History of Armenian Christianity and Theology (3)

  • Hum.    362 Armenian Civilization (3)

  • SocSc 389    Topics on the Armenian Diaspora (3)

  • Art 324    Survey of Armenian Art and Architecture (4)

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  • ARMENIAN LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS (27 Semester Units)

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  • 1Arm. 300     Advanced Modern Armenian (3) (or, credit by exam)

  • Arm. 311/313    Armenian Grammar—Morphology (3)

  • Arm. 312/314    Armenian Grammar—Syntax (3)

  • Arm. 315    Armenian Phonetics—Phonology (3)

  • Arm. 316    Armenian Lexicology (3)

  • Arm. 317    Armenian Orthography (3)

  • Arm. 318    History of Armenian Language (3)

  • Arm. 399    Professional Paper (3)

  • Educ. 308    Teaching—Learning Strategies—Armenian Emphasis (3)

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  • COMPUTER TRAINING (16 Semester Units)

  • COMP100    Introduction to Microsoft Windows 98 (4) R

  • COMP 101    Microsoft Word 2000 (Intermediate Level) (4) R

  • COMP 200    Microsoft Excel 2000 (Intermediate Level) (4) R

  • COMP 201    Microsoft Access 2000 (Intermediate Level) (4) R

  • COMP 212    Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 (4)

  • COMP 223    Advanced Word/Excel/Access (4)

  • COMP 229    Computerized Accounting (8)

  • COMP 233    Computerized Video Editing (8)

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  • EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (12-24 Semester Units)

  • ECE 110    Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3) R

  • ECE 112A    Administration (3) R

  • ECE 112B    Advanced Administrative Issues (3) R

  • ECE 113A    Early Childhood Education Field Practice (3)

  • ECE 113B    Early Childhood Education Field Practice (3)

  • ECE 113C    Early Childhood Education Field Practice (3)

  • ECE 215    Home, School, Community (3) R

  • ECE 216    Health and Safety for Young Children (3) R

  • ECE 217    Children in a Multi-Cultural Society (3)

  • ECE 220    Curriculum Planning (3) R

  • ECE 226    Child Care Procedures (1)

  • ECE 227    Building Self-Esteem in Young Children (3)

  • ECE 228    Techniques for Behavior Change in Young Children (3)

  • ECE 229    Positive Discipline Strategies for Young Children (3)

  • ECE 230    Practical Issues for Infant and Toddler Programs:    Building Alliances with Parents (3)

  • ECE 231    Home-School Cooperation and Parent Conferencing (3)

  • ECE 232    Human Interaction in Staffing and Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3)

  • PSYCH 221    Child Psychology and Development (3) R

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  • LICENSING REQUIREMENTS

  • California State Department of Social Service Regulations (Title 22) governing:

  • PRIVATE PRESCHOOLS

  • Job: Teacher, Child Care Center/Preschool Education:

  • High school diploma (or courses leading to) plus 12 units in Early Childhood Education that must include:

  • Psychology of Child Development (221)

  • Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE 110)

  • Home, School and Community (ECE 215) and three units in either:

  • Curriculum Planning (ECE 220) or Health and Safety (ECE 216)

  • Job: Director, Child Care Center/Preschool Education:

  • 12 units in Early Childhood Education (see above), plus 6 units in ECE.

  • Administration and Administrative/Staff Relations (ECE 112A and 112B).

  • Experience:

  • 1 year plus B.A. or

  • 2 years plus A.A. or

  • 4 years and above units

  • (Note: 1 year equals 100 days of 3 hours per day.)

  • Note: A certificate of completion in Early Childhood Education fully qualifies

  • students to meet Title 22 regulations and teach in private preschools in California.

  • California State Department of Education Regulations and Credential (Title 5) governing:

  • Job:   Teacher/Public Preschool

  • Head Start

  • State Preschool

  • Migrant Programs

  • Children's Programs

  • Required education and experience for California Children's Center Instructional Permit:

  • 24 units in Early Childhood Education (including courses listed above), completed with "C" grade or better.

  • 16 semester units of course work in general education including at least one course in each of the following areas: humanities, social sciences, math and/or science, and English.

  • Plus:

  • 2 years experience or 1 year plus field practice

  • Job: Supervisor/Director, Public

  • Preschool Education and Experience:

  • Clear California Children's Instructional Permit

  • B.A. Degree

  • 6 units of administrative courses (1 advanced level)

  • 5 years teaching experience on the above instructional permit

  • Co-enrollment in ECE 113 and ECE 226 is necessary.

  • Three semesters of ECE 113 are required. Students work 15 hours a week in a licensed childcare facility, either paid or volunteer.

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  • ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE - NON-CREDIT

  • 1.ESL 101     Beginning English as a Second Language

  • 2.ESL 102    Speaking English as a Second Language—Intermediate I

  • 3.ESL 103    English as a Second Language—Intermediate II

  • 4.ESL 104     Advanced English as a Second Language

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  • TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION (8-16 SEMESTER UNITS)

  • TRANS 303 Communication Theory, Language and Communication Behavior, Theory and Techniques of Translation and Interpretation, Practicing the Skills of Translation and Interpretation (4) 

  • TRANS 303.1 Building Skills in Text Analysis and Terminology Research.Legal, Political, Economic Terminology, Intercultural Communication, Writing, Speaking and Reading Workshop (4) 

  • DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

  • ARMENIAN STUDIES

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  • ARMN 100    Elementary Modern Armenian I (3).

  • Introduces alphabet, pronunciation, and word order patterns. Focuses on basic skills. For students with little or no previous knowledge of Armenian.

  • NCh.

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  • ARMN 101    Elementary Modern Armenian II (3).

  • Continuation of 100, with emphasis on vocabulary and conversation. Introduces grammar. NCh.

  • ARMN 200    Intermediate Modern Armenian I (3).

  • Grammar, syntax, and conversational skills. Dictation and simple composition.

  •  

  • ARMN 201    Intermediate Modern Armenian II (3).

  • Continuation of 200.

  •  

  • ARMN 214    Survey of Arm. Literature through the 14th Century (3).

  • Armenian classical writers and their works. Introduces literary views and problems in ancient and medieval Armenia.

  •  

  • ARMN 215    Survey of Modern Armenian Literature (3).

  • Armenian writers since 15th century, with emphasis on 19th and 20th

  • centuries. Introduces issues and problems in modern Armenian literature.

  •  

  • ARMN 300    Advanced Modern Armenian (3).

  • Writing of essays and articles with emphasis on composition, style, and grammar. Reading fairly complex texts.

  •  

  • ARMN 306    Elementary Classical Armenian (3).

  • Basic Grammar, with emphasis on comparative study and translation from classical Armenian into modern Armenian and English.

  •  

  • ARMN 310    Armenian Novel (3).

  • The birth of Armenian prose, its development during the Middle Ages, Modernization in the beginning of the 19th century, the Contemporary Armenian Novel. NCh

  •  

  • ARMN 311 or 313    Western and/or Eastern Armenian Grammar - Morphology (3).

  • This course represents an important division of Western and/or Eastern

  •  Armenian Grammar including: Parts of speech, the scientific classification and grammatical, morphological features, etc. Prerequisite: Armenian III (300) or equivalent.

  • ARMN 312 or 314    Western and/or Eastern Armenian Grammar – Syntax (3).

  • This course represents an important division of Western and/or Eastern Armenian Grammar including: The structure of sentence and features, the organs of sentence and their relationship, subject, verb and complements, active and passive voices, punctuation, etc. Prerequisite: Morphology 311, 313.

  •  

  • ARMN 315    Armenian Phonetics - Phonology (3).

  • This course represents: The articulation of sounds, the phonetic system of

  • Western and/or Eastern Armenian, phonetic and phonological features, classification, etc. Prerequisite: Armenian III (300) or equivalent.

  •  

  • ARMN 316    Armenian Lexicology (3).

  • This course includes: The derivation of words, native Armenian words, borrowed words, the relationship of form, meaning and sound, Armenian lexicon, compound words, etc. Prerequisite: Armenian III (300) or

  • equivalent.

  •  

  • ARMN 317    Armenian Orthography (3).

  • This course includes: The formation and development of Armenian classical orthography, spelling rules, comparison of classical and modern orthographies, etc. Prerequisite: Armenian III (300) or equivalent.

  •  

  • ARMN318    History of Armenian Language (3)

  • History of Armenian language, origins to present. Languages belonging to the Indo-European family, the relationship of the Armenian language to other Indo-European languages; the eastern and western dialects of Armenian; comparative study of grammatical and morphological features.

  •  

  • ARMN 320    American-Armenian Writers (3).

  • Focus on problems posed by the Armenian Diaspora and duality of cultural heritages as

  • perceived by American writers of Armenian origin. Taught in English. NCh.

  •  

  • ARMN399    Senior Project (3).

  •  

  • ART324    Survey of Armenian Art and Architecture (4).

  • Introduces one or two of the following areas of Armenian art: Miniature Art, Architecture, Khatch Kars, sculpture and painting.

  •  

  • EDUC308    Teaching-Learning Strategies — Armenian Emphasis (3).

  • Educational assessment, planning and evaluation. Emphasizes curriculum development and skills, techniques and strategies for bilingual cross/cultural teaching competencies.

  •  

  •  

  • HIST 220    History of Armenian People - Origins to 1500 A.D. (3)

  • Armenians as an Indo-European people, the firs ethnic formations, Armenians and the Iranians, Greeks Hittites, Assyrians, Sumerians, Scythians, Cimmerians and others. Political, economic, social, religious and cultural history of the Armenian people.

  • HIST 221    History of Armenian People - 1500 A.D. to Present (3).

  • Continuation of 220, including Soviet Armenia, Modern Armenia and

  • Armenians in the Diaspora.

  • HIST 223    Modern Armenia (1918-1993) (3).

  • The Armenian Republic, Sovietization of Armenia and the struggle of

  • Armenian people against Bolshevik rule. The re-establishment of the New Republic.

  •  

  • HIST 321    The Armenian Question (3).

  • The definition of the Armenian question. Structure of the Armenian question. The historical, political and diplomatic bases of the Armenian question. Changes in the concept of the Armenian question. The Armenian Question on the agenda of world forums. The proposed means to resolve the Armenian question. The Armenian Question in the policy of the Armenian state, the church, political parties and organizations.

  •  

  • HIST 322    History of Armenian Christianity and Theology (3).

  • The pantheon of pagan Armenia. The first Christian communities in Armenia. The religious, cultural and political aspects of declaring Christianity as state religion in Armenia. The apostolic essence of the Armenian Church and its evangelical essence. The doctrine and structure of the Armenian Church, the relations of the Armenian Church with the Assyrian, Greek, Georgian, Albanian, and Latin churches. The sectarian movements. The political, cultural and social role of the Armenian Church. The foundation of the Armenian Catholic and Protestant churches. The Armenian churches today and the ecumenical movement.

  •  

  • HIST 324    History of Armenian Education and Psychology (3).

  • Education and educational institutions in the history of Armenian people from ancient times to present. Education in Hellenistic Armenia. The first Christian revolution in Armenian Education. Types and centers of

  • Mediaeval Armenian schools, their curriculum. The Armenian Universities of the Middle Ages. Diaspora Armenian Schools. The modernization of the

  • Educational system. Armenian Educational system under Soviet rule. The contemporary Armenian schools in the Diaspora. NCh.

  • HUM 362    Introduction to Armenian Civilization (3).

  • A holistic approach to Armenian heritage. The integration of economic, social, political, cultural, religious, literary, artistic, geographical factors in Armenian history from its origin to the present times.

  •  

  • MUS 241    History of Armenian Music (3).

  • Studies history and theory of Armenian sacred and secular music from the 5th Century to the present. Emphasizes modern and contemporary Armenian composers.

  •  

  • PLSC 368    Armenian Political Institutions (3).

  •  

  • Government and non-governmental political institutions in recent and contemporary Armenian history. Decision-making process and impact on Armenian society. Prereq.: HIST 221 or instructor's approval. NCh.

  •  

  • SOSC 389    Topics in the Study of the Armenian Diaspora (3).

  • The history of the main phases of the Armenian Diaspora from its origin to the present time.  The structure and functions of the Diaspora  as  an economic, social, political and cultural entity, the socio-psychological image of the Diaspora Armenian today. The role of the Diaspora in the birth and development of the Armenian Republic.

  • Seminar in a specialized subject, focusing on social, psychological, cultural, or political aspect of Armenian communities. Prereq.: ARMN 362 or 223 or instructor's approval. NCh.

  • COMPUTER TRAINING

  • COMP 100    Introduction to Microsoft Windows 98 (4)

  • This Course Includes: The Computer, Its Major Components And Environment. The Desktop. Managing Files, Folders & Disk Drives with My Computer. The Windows Explorer. Organizing Your HDD. The Task Bar. Using the Internet

  •  

  • COMP 101    Microsoft Word 2019 (Intermediate Level) (4)

  • This Course represents: The Word Processing Concept & Methodology. A Tour of The Word Screen. Typing, Selecting, Correcting, Moving, Copying and Checking text. Formatting Characters & Paragraphs. Page Views & Formats "Basics". Word's Reusability Features- Never Type Again "Basics". The Drawing Toolbar. Managing Tables. Data Entry. Data Entry, Envelopes & Labels. Mail Merge.

  •  

  • COMP 200    Microsoft Excel 2019 (Intermediate Level) (4)

  • This Course includes: The Spreadsheet Concept. A Tour of the Excel Screen. Data Entry Tips and Tricks. Formatting Data and Workbooks. Formulas and Functions Built to Last. Charting Your Data. Linking

  • Worksheets and Workbooks "Basics". File and Print Operations "Basics". Data Handling "Basics". Excel's Reusability Features "Basics". Mapping Your Spreadsheets Creating On - Line Spreadsheets. Organizing Charts. Prerequisite: Win98 100 — Word 100

  • COMP 201    Microsoft Access 2019 (Intermediate Level) (4)

  • This Course Includes: The Definition of the Structure "File/Table", the Record and the Field. A Tour Of The Screen. Introduction to the Programming Logic. The Main Elements of Access. Working With Data in Tables.  Using Forms with Data. Asking Questions of Your Data with Queries. Publishing Your Data with Reports. Connecting Access to the Outside World "Basics". Access as a Relational Database "Basics". Office Connections "Basics".  Prerequisite: Win98 100 — Word 100

  •  

  • COMP 212    Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 (4)

  •  

  •  

  • This Course Includes: A tour Of the PowerPoint Screen. Text Tips and Formats. Animation, Art and Sound. Making the Presentation. Master

  • Templates & Reusability. File Management and Taking it on the Road. Office 

  •  

  • Connections—the Whole Office Presentation—PowerPoint and the Web—Macros in PowerPoint.

  • Prerequisite: Win10 100 — Word 100

  •  

  • This Course Includes: The Programming Logic and Concept. How to Program. A Tour of the Screen. The Object-Oriented Programming.

  • Variables, Constants and Associated Functions. Sub-Routines, Functions and the Visual Basic Language. Controls. Building the GUI with Forms. Menus and MDI Forms. Building Classes. Using ActiveX Controls.

  • Printing. Problem Solving. Adding Pizzazz with Graphics. Reading and Writing Disk Files. Database Programming. VBASIC & Access. Data Access

  • Methods (DAO — Data Access Object). SQL Language. Prerequisite: WIN98 100 — Word 100. Access 300.

  •  

  • COMP 223    Advanced Word/Excel/Access (4)

  • This Course Includes: Advanced Word 2019. Advanced Excel 2019.

  • Advanced Access 2019. Advanced MS Windows 10. Word 2019 & the Web. Access 2019 & the Web. Excel 2000 & the Web. Using and Understanding Outlook 2019. Sharing Data between Applications with OLE. MS DOS V.

  • 6.22 Most Useful Properties & Commands.     Basic Networking (MS

  • WINDOWS NT 4.0). Customizing Word 2019.  Excel2019, Access 2019.

  • Understanding & Using MS PowerPoint 2019. PC Systems Technician (Basics). MS Windows Troubleshooting.  Customizing Microsoft Windows 10.

  • Advanced Internet Options.

  • Prerequisite: Win10 — Word 100.  Excel 200.  Access 300

  •  

  • COMP 229    Computerized Accounting (8)

  • This course Includes: The Accounting System. How to manage the Accounting of a Corporation or DBA. Understanding the different

  • Accounting Modules. Understanding & Managing the basic bookkeeping of a Corporation. Quick Books (Advanced Level). Understanding & Managing the Taxing system Via Accounting System. Bookkeeping. Invoicing.

  • Receiving Payments. Tracking Accounts Receivable. Entering Accounts Payable Bills. Paying Bills. Running Payroll. Government Payroll Reporting. Configuring and Tracking Inventory. Making Checkbook Adjustments. Reconciling Bank Accounts. Using Budgets. Using Journal Entries. Running General Ledger Reports. Using Online Banking Services. Year—End Procedures. Using Time and Billing.

  • Prerequisite: Win10 100—Word 100, Excel 200.

  •  

  • COMP 231    Computerized Video Editing (8)

  • Logging and capturing raw video, assembly of shots on a timeline, and the use of effects in the creation of a final video sequence. In-depth overview of the video editing process.